Massage Therapy in Shallotte

About Massage Therapy

Massage is one of the oldest healing arts: Chinese records dating back 3,000 years document its use; the ancient Hindus, Persians and Egyptians applied forms of massage for many ailments; and Hippocrates wrote papers recommending the use of rubbing and friction for joint and circulatory problems. Today, the benefits of massage are Massage Therapyvaried and far-reaching. As an accepted part of many physical rehabilitation programs, massage therapy has also proven beneficial for many chronic conditions, including low back pain, arthritis, bursitis, fatigue, high blood pressure, diabetes, immunity suppression, infertility, smoking cessation, depression, and more. And, as many millions will attest, massage also helps relieve the stress and tension of everyday living that can lead to disease and illness.

So What Is It Exactly?

Massage, bodywork and somatic therapies are defined as the application of various techniques to the muscular structure and soft tissues of the human body. Specifically: Massage: The application of soft-tissue manipulation techniques to the body, generally intended to reduce stress and fatigue while improving circulation. The many variations of massage account for several different techniques. Bodywork: Various forms of touch therapies that may use manipulation, movement, and/or repatterning to affect structural changes to the body. Somatic: Meaning “of the body.” Many times this term is used to denote a body/mind or whole-body approach as distinguished from a physiology-only or environmental perspective. There are more than 250 variations of massage, bodywork, and somatic therapies and many practitioners utilize multiple techniques. The application of these techniques may include, but is not limited to, stroking, kneading, tapping, compression, vibration, rocking, friction, and pressure to the muscular structure or soft tissues of the human body. This may also include non-forceful passive or active movement and/or application of techniques intended to affect the energetic systems of the body. The use of oils, lotions, and powders may also be included to reduce friction on the skin. Please note: Massage, bodywork and somatic therapies specifically exclude diagnosis, prescription, manipulation or adjustments of the human skeletal structure, or any other service, procedure or therapy which requires a license to practice orthopedics, physical therapy, podiatry, chiropractic, osteopathy, psychotherapy, acupuncture, or any other profession or branch of medicine.

Will My Insurance Cover It?

The services of a bodywork professional may be covered by health insurance when prescribed by a chiropractor or osteopath. Therapies provided as part of a prescribed treatment by a physician or registered physical therapist are often covered.

People get massage therapy for relaxation or for a variety of health conditions:

Therapeutic Exercises

  • Back pain
  • Inflammatory conditions such as arthritis and tendinitis
  • Headaches and migraines
  • Muscle and related conditions such as spasms, strains and sprains
  • Repetitive strain injury, such as carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Circulatory and respiratory problems
  • Post-injury and post surgical rehabilitation
  • Massage therapy relieves stress. It is thought to help the body’s stress response by lowering levels of hormones such as cortisol
  • Massage therapy also appears to enhance immune function.

Treatment Options:

Deep Tissue

Techniques which utilize deep tissue/deep muscle massage are administered to affect the sub-layer of musculature and fascia. The muscles must be relaxed in order to effectively perform deep tissue massage, otherwise tight surface muscles prevent the practitioner from reaching deeper musculature. It helps with chronic muscular pain and injury rehabilitation, and reduces inflammation-related pain caused by arthritis and tendonitis.

Myofascial Release

Myofascial release is an effective therapeutic approach in the relief of cervical pain, back pain, fibromyalgia, scoliosis, neurological dysfunction, restriction of motion, chronic pain, and headaches.

Trigger Point

Pain-relief techniques to alleviate muscle spasms and cramping. The therapist locates and deactivates ‘trigger points’, which are often tender areas where muscles have been damaged or acquired a re-occurring spasm or ‘kink’ that worsens painfully when aggravated. The major goals are to reduce spasm inducing new blood flow into the affected area. Pressure is applied to trigger points, for a short time, which can be momentarily painful but is greatly relieving. Often ice or another cooling agent is used to reduce nervous system response, making the area easier and more comfortable to work.

Sports Massage

This form of massage focuses on treating musculo-skeletal issues from sports-related activities as well as those that are very active for work – construction workers, mechanics and farmers to name a few. Sports massage may incorporate similar techniques to Swedish massage but will include more soft tissue techniques, stretching and deep tissue.


Swedish massage can relax muscles, increase circulation, remove metabolic waste products, help the recipient obtain a feeling of connectedness, a better awareness of their body and the way they use and position it. One of the primary goals of Swedish massage is to speed venous return from the extremities. Swedish massage shortens recovery time from muscular strain by flushing the tissue of lactic acid, uric acid and other metabolic wastes. It improves circulation without increasing heart load. It stretches the ligaments and tendons, keeping them supple. Swedish massage also stimulates the skin and nervous system while at the same time relaxing the nerves themselves. As it can help reduce emotional and physical stress it is often recommended as part of a regular program for stress management. It also has specific clinical uses in a medical or remedial therapy.

First Visit Expectations & Pricing

A typical massage therapy session is between 30 and 90 minutes. Your massage will begin with a brief consultation and review of symptoms, medical history, and lifestyle. You will be asked to undress (many people keep their underwear on) while the massage therapist is out of the room, and lie face down under a sheet on a padded massage table. The massage therapist will knock on the door to make sure you are ready. The massage therapist re-enters the room and will then adjust the face rest and pillows to ensure that you are comfortable and properly positioned. Tell the massage therapist if you are too warm or cold. The massage therapist uses a light oil or lotion on the skin and begins the massage. A full body massage usually begins on the back and then moves down to the legs. You will then be asked to turn over so you are face up. The massage continues on your arms, legs, neck, and abdomen. You are underneath the sheet at all times, and in North America, only the part of the body being treated at any one time is uncovered. After the massage, the massage therapist leaves the room so you can get changed. Take your time getting up. If you sit or stand too quickly you may feel lightheaded or dizzy.


Massage therapy is not recommended for certain people:

  • People with infectious skin disease, rash, or open wounds
  • Immediately after surgery
  • Immediately after chemotherapy or radiation, unless recommended by your doctor
  • People prone to blood clots. There is a risk of blood clots being dislodged. If you have heart disease, check with your doctor before having a massage
  • Pregnant women should check with their doctor first if they are considering getting a massage. Massage in pregnant women should be done by massage therapists who are certified in pregnancy massage.
  • Massage should not be done directly over bruises, inflamed skin, unhealed wounds, tumors, abdominal hernia, or areas of recent fractures.

Massage Advice:

  • Don’t eat a heavy meal before the massage
  • Be sure to drink plenty of water both before and after the massage to flush out toxins that have been released during your massage.
  • If it’s your first time at the clinic or spa, arrive at least 10 minutes early to complete the necessary forms. Otherwise, arrive 5 minutes early so you can have a few minutes to rest and relax before starting the massage.

Massage Rates:

60 min Swedish Massage – $70massage

90 min Swedish Massage – $100

60 min Deep Tissue Massage – $90

60 min Prenatal Massage – $75

30 min Head, Neck, Back & Shoulder Massage – $45

We accept cash, checks and charges (Visa, MC, Discover).

Tips – if you wish to tip your massage therapist which is recommended, we ask that you do so with cash or a separate check. We cannot add a tip to the credit card.

Gift Certificates are ALWAYS available!